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Trey Miguel Tears It Up With Cage and Pillman Jr

Trey Miguel pulls double duty on this week’s Warrior Wrestling’s Greatest Matches, taking on his fellow Rascalz before getting his shot at the Warrior Wrestling Championship in a triple threat encounter with ‘The Machine’ Brian Cage and then-champion Brian Pillman Jr. Plus, we get an appearance from everyone’s favorite wrestling elder, Mick Foley.

This looks to be a stacked show so let’s get to the ring and get into it!

Battle of The Rascalz (Stadium Series 2)

The Rascalz are perhaps one of the hottest tag teams on the planet right now. However, their numbers are depleted now that Trey Miguel decided to return to Impact instead of following Dezmond Xavier and Zachary Wentz to NXT (where they wrestle under the names Wes Lee and Nash Carter, respectively as MSK).

The Rascalz had long been seen as a tight-knit unit, which made this triple threat match so surprising. Of course, it helped that the winner would get a shot at the Warrior Wrestling Championship the following week.

This was exactly what you would expect from a match pitting The Rascalz against each other, and that’s not a bad thing. Velocity was the name of the game here as the three flew at and around each with frightening levels of speed. The exchanges between them were highly polished and, although some sequences could be said to be a little too smooth or choreographed. What I will say is that, compared to some performers, there wasn’t a single botch or blown spot that I noticed here. This is all the more impressive considering the speed of performance, and you couldn’t help but be dragged along for the ride as The Rascalz flew right by you.

Partway through, there was a funny spot where the Rascalz had each other in sleepers in a line. The front Rascal grabbed the ref for (I presume) leverage, putting them in a sleeper too. So, the ref did the unexpected: dropped down and nailed all the Rascalz with a stunner in a domino effect! On its own, that would have been good anyway if a little too cute. But what made it for me was the ref telling the Rascalz off afterward only to realize everyone in the crowd had seen what he’d done. The way he put his hand to his head in embarrassment afterward sealed the deal for me.

Trey eventually took the win with a double knee drop to Wentz from the top as Wentz was tangled with Xavier on the buckles. Trey put his arm over both men; Wentz got his shoulder up. Xavier didn’t. The championship opportunity was all Trey’s.

This match might be to everyone’s taste, but I enjoyed it very much. It was slick, smooth, fast-paced, and exhilarating—no complaints from me.

Warrior Wrestling Champion Brian Pillman Jr vs. Trey Miguel vs. Brian Cage (Stadium Series 3)

Trey Miguel vs. Brian Pillman Jr Warrior Wrestling title card

This match arrived the following week, with Brian Cage muscling his way in to make it a triple threat. Thank God he did. Not because there would have been anything wrong with Pillman vs. Miguel, but Cage made a good thing even better, helping to take things to the next level.

In fact, this was a fantastic match, plain and simple. Pillman Jr and Miguel had to combine their might to take Cage out of the game so that they could then face off against each other, where realistically, they had more of a chance of succeeding. Cage would then come back to life like the Terminator he is, throwing the lighter pair around like rag dolls. Indeed, when Cage power bombed Pillman against the apron and Miguel on the football field and later nailed Miguel with a nasty buckle bombed, I winced so hard it was unreal. There’s a reason Cage is so respected and so feared.

Miguel had to use his speed and agility to take Cage out while Pillman got a near-fall with a Jackhammer. But it was Miguel who took the gold with a sneaky roll-up out of nowhere. It was so quick that even Miguel looked surprised!

If you’ve not seen this match, check it out. Immediately. Go on, I’ll wait. All three men looked amazing throughout. There’s a logic to each man’s approach, and the chemistry was completely solid. Great stuff from Warrior Wrestling here.

Mick Foley vs. Frank The Clown (Warrior Wrestling 6)

This isn’t an actual match but an angle between Foley and his daughter Noelle’s boyfriend Frank the Clown. Apparently, Frank (in kayfabe) had not been too happy about his father-in-law supposedly watching over their relationship, and was going to give the Hardcore Legend a severe telling off. Which is fine, but you probably shouldn’t do that whilst wearing tights with Noelle’s face plastered all over them and uttering lines such as “you may be Noelle’s father…but she calls me daddy now!”

Accordingly, Foley gave Frank a good dose of Mr. Socko, followed by a kitchen-tonged squeeze of the juggling balls, a barbed wire baseball bat-assisted legdrop to said balls, and a potential burning as Foley poured kerosene over Frank and pulled out a lighter. As Frank was saved at the last minute by being pulled out of the ring, Foley nailed the punchline as the crowd booed: “I know that was kinda unsatisfying, right? But now doesn’t it feel like a real honest to goodness WWE pay-per-view?” Boom—the crowd popped like mad for that one.

In fact, what was most enjoyable for me here was how Foley demonstrated his mastery of working the crowd. By the end, they were eating out of the palm of his hand. If any major promotions want to hire Foley, he would kill it as a promo coach. Seriously. He might not know how to do a 450 splash, but man, does he understand psychology and how to talk.

Final Thoughts

This was my favorite of the Warrior Wrestling Greatest Matches shows so far. The Rascalz nailed their aerial assaults, the triple threat title match was outstanding, and saw Trey Miguel take the Warrior Wrestling Championship, and Mick Foley proved he still knows how to work a crowd.

If you’ve never seen Warrior Wrestling before, start with this show. You won’t be disappointed.

Written by Chris Flackett

Wrestling obsessed since '91. Lived through the Monday Night Wars and is still here to tell the tale. Major fan of Strong Style, technical and Super Jr. Wrestling, as well as big versatile hosses smacking the hell out of each other. Lives in Manchester, England.

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